People of the 2019 Women’s March Marchers share their stories and insights at the third annual demonstration for women's rights.

“I don’t like what Trump says, so I’m here to hear the speeches.”

-Joanna

“I’m dressing as one of the handmaids from the Handmaid’s Tale. This is a quote from the book, just to kind of go along with the whole “I’m not ok with what’s going on” thing. And to visualize. I’m afraid that the dystopia in the book and the show is what the country is going toward.” 

– Stephanie, right

“Over the years, back in the ’70s when I came of age, there was no oppression of women. Women were in a different time frame then, but what I’ve seen happening over the ’80s, ’90s, and now, I find it very disturbing. My presence here, I hope, is to be strong for other people, especially young people. I hate to see these guys and you have to live in a world where everything’s been stripped away. And the way things are going right now, it’s very scary because we have someone in power who believes in that.”

-Kathy, left

“It’s become a social construct to be feminine or to be masculine because it started with our gender, but it’s more fluid now. It’s for everyone. Men are put down all the time for showing any feminine or girly qualities but they can, there’s nothing wrong with that.”

-Shiyana

“We need to take over. We need to take control. All women are people too. We are not represented in a lot of places, a lot of economic places. We need to take over the country. We need a woman president of the United States. And in Spain, too. We need women in economic positions, power positions. We need women in power positions. It’s really important.”

-Eva

“I came here to boost intersectionality in feminism. It’s really important to not just subscribe to white feminism and really support people whose voices cannot be heard. I hope the government starts to take more of an equitable approach. I think equality is not what we should be aiming for, it should be equity and giving people access to accomplish what they want.”

-Jillian

“[Being a woman] means lots of things. But I was raised in a family of five girls, all women. I went to an all-women’s Catholic high school in Detroit and university. So I’ve been around women a lot. One of the things I’ve learned is, as a woman, early on I felt very comfortable speaking out in school and in college because I was in a women’s environment. With that background, my family, where we’re all encouraged to speak out, probably too much, I’ve been active in all kinds of things because of that. Women’s rights to speak out is really important to me, women’s rights to be heard, young girls’ rights to be heard—all of that is important to me.”

-Maureen, right

“We’ve been coming for three years to the women’s marches. It’s a wonderful place to be. There’s a lot of fellow feeling here.”

-Tom, left

“One of our teachers is fighting for equal pay for the Boston Symphony Orchestra right now. That’s my poster. I like to see more women fighting.”

-Sammy

“It’s important not only to be an ally, but to counter the war on women and women’s rights. It’s important to have that solidarity and for many more men to step up and stand behind, in front, and do everything to help women and women’s rights. Not only in health care, social injustice, pay equity, and just equality. It’s overdue.”

-Dave, right

“I’m a teacher—I teach first graders. I’m here for them, because I worry about the world. I worry about climate change. I worry about the lack of gun control. I worry about just what kind of world they’re going to have when we have all of these conservative judges that are being put in [office] all over the place in addition to the Supreme Court. So I feel like I need to be here with them in mind, my own family of young people as well as the ones I teach.”

-Carol, left

“Overall, I want to be a good example for my daughter today. This is her first protest, her first march, and she was just asking me about Martin Luther King. I told her he stood up to bad values, he stood up against everything that was wrong with America at the time—and still is—and she wants to do her part to save the world.”

-Nayera

“[I’m here] to be like Martin Luther King.”

-Mariam

Featured Image by Johnathan Ye / Heights Editor

Images by Mary Wilkie / Heights Editor

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